Official blog for neighborhoods in the City of Greenville, NC.
Intended to catalog & exchange information and ideas relevant to neighborhood development.

It’s hot…so be cool!
Effective Monday, June 11th, please have your trash curbside by 6 AM on your pick-up day. Have something specific and not sure if Sanitation will pick it up? This FAQ may help!

It’s hot…so be cool!

Effective Monday, June 11th, please have your trash curbside by 6 AM on your pick-up day. Have something specific and not sure if Sanitation will pick it up? This FAQ may help!

In keeping with our tree-theme: Can trees deter crime?

While low-dense brush seems to increase it [crime], tall broad canopies seem to decrease it.

More trees in Greenville, please! At last night’s NAB meeting, Kevin Heifferon, Building and Grounds Superintendent and City Arborist for the City of Greenville, explained the goals of the city’s Urban Forest Master plan, including increasing Greenville’s canopy cover and identifying ways to diversify the types of trees planted throughout the city. [Presentation] Mr. Heifferon stressed that resident input was an important part of creating a usable plan that does not “sit on a shelf, but rather sits in a truck.” If you are interested in commenting on this plan, please submit the input form below to Kevin Heifferon (don’t forget to save it as a new document first!) [Input form] And someone to take care of them! While NAB members and other guests inquired about specific types of trees and their viability in Eastern Carolina, the meeting’s discussion also highlighted the need for City Council to hire a full-time urban forester to implement this plan, advising residents on appropriate trees and continually monitoring Greenville’s “public” trees—trees located in the right-of-way and other communal locations.
Wondering what trees thrive in Eastern Carolina? The city’s zoning code (really!) has an extensive list of trees to advise you, but Mr. Heifferon also suggested consulting a local nursery, since they typically stock trees, shrubs, and other plants that grow well in our climate.[Article 9. Vegetation requirements (Extensive list of species on pages 8-12)]

More trees in Greenville, please! At last night’s NAB meeting, Kevin Heifferon, Building and Grounds Superintendent and City Arborist for the City of Greenville, explained the goals of the city’s Urban Forest Master plan, including increasing Greenville’s canopy cover and identifying ways to diversify the types of trees planted throughout the city. [Presentation]

Mr. Heifferon stressed that resident input was an important part of creating a usable plan that does not “sit on a shelf, but rather sits in a truck.” If you are interested in commenting on this plan, please submit the input form below to Kevin Heifferon (don’t forget to save it as a new document first!) [Input form]

And someone to take care of them! While NAB members and other guests inquired about specific types of trees and their viability in Eastern Carolina, the meeting’s discussion also highlighted the need for City Council to hire a full-time urban forester to implement this plan, advising residents on appropriate trees and continually monitoring Greenville’s “public” trees—trees located in the right-of-way and other communal locations.

Wondering what trees thrive in Eastern Carolina? The city’s zoning code (really!) has an extensive list of trees to advise you, but Mr. Heifferon also suggested consulting a local nursery, since they typically stock trees, shrubs, and other plants that grow well in our climate.
[Article 9. Vegetation requirements (Extensive list of species on pages 8-12)]

WATCH: The NAB's been busy in 2011-12!

The Neighborhood Advisory (NAB) accomplished its workplan priorities from its 2011-12 workplan, including:

   ● holding 3 community-wide meetings in Districts 2, 4, and 5 (attracting 20-
     40+ participants);
   ● providing input to City Council on three separate regulations;
   partnering with the Police Community Relations Committee to host a
      Neighborhood Watch Workshop; and
   organizing its second-annual symposium: IMAGINE! United Neighborhoods.

At its annual planning session on Monday, May 7, 2012, NAB members and other neighborhood leaders created a collective vision for Greenville neighborhoods: more attractive, cooperative, and well-connected neighborhoods, and identified three broad steps to help move toward it: education; outreach; and greening/beautification.

Stay tuned for a more detailed post on the NAB’s vision and 2012-13 workplan!

Text

As always, the Neighborhood Advisory Board (NAB) had a thoughtful discussion last Thursday night about two land-use issues it’s been tracking: text amendments that could change the separation requirements between family-care homes and how many unrelated persons can live in a house.

3-unrelated rule

The NAB received a presentation on the 3-unrelated rule, including the Community Development Department’s (CDD) process to develop “code [text] amendment alternatives” and solicit stakeholder input prior to presenting its report to City Council (in August 2012 as of now).
[Presentation]   [CDD staff memo to City Council]   [Glossary of planning terms] 

CDD staff is developing a factsheet and webpage about the 3-unrelated rule on the city’s website, where you and your neighbors can learn more about this standard and find the dates and locations for the stakeholder meetings as these details are finalized.

Members also requested a copy of Elmhurst-Englewood Neighborhood Association’s (EENA) newsletter, which discusses the association’s view on a potential change to the 3-unrelated rule. [ENNA newsletter excerpt]

Please note EENA lists contact information for its City Council representative; contact information for all City Council members and the mayor can be found here.

Family-care homes

The NAB also received an update on a text amendment related to family-care homes, although the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission recommended City Council deny the proposed change. [Presentation]

In line with its discussion in March 2012, the NAB voted to forward a statement to City Council supporting the current separation of ¼ mile and the Planning and Zoning Commission’s recommendation to deny a change.

City Council will receive the NAB’s statement in its weekly notes and is scheduled to vote on this issue in May 2012. As a reminder, City Council can 1) approve the proposed change; 2) deny the proposed change (in accordance with the Planning & Zoning Commission’s recommendation); or 3) request more information.

Welcome new members—and planning for this year!

The NAB also discussed holding its annual planning session outside of its regular meeting time. During the planning session, the NAB will create its annual workplan and review its rules and procedures. Members received a list of possible dates in May for this purpose, but all liaisons and other interested residents are encouraged to attend!

[NAB 2011-12 workplan]   [NAB handbook]

Last, but certainly not least, the NAB welcomed its new members: Kimberly Carney (Countryside Estates; District 1); Carolyn Glast (District 1; Greenfield Terrace); David Douglas (District 2; Red Oak); Betty Hines (District 2; Greenbrier); and Scott Hucks (District 4; Eastwood) and re-elected Ann Maxwell (District 3; Tar River-University) for another 1-year term as NAB chair.

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